Cookware Q & A

Cookware Q & A

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What is the difference between the different grades of stainless steel used in cookware?
There are different grades of stainless steel used in cookware indicating the level of quality of stainless steel, i.e., the level of chrome and nickel added to the basic steel composition to provide additional rust and acid resistance. Quality stainless steel contains 18% chrome and 0% nickel for strong rust resistance with nil acid resistance. High quality stainless steel – contains 18% chrome and 4% nickel for strong rust and moderate acid resistance. 18/10 stainless steel is the highest quality, containing 18% chrome and 10% nickel for the most rust and acid resistance available.
What is hard anodised cookware?
Hard anodised aluminium cookware is the largely growing in popularity. It was originally designed for restaurant cooking and refers to the surface of the pan (not the non-stick coating). The cookware becomes ‘anodised’ through an electro chemical process, resulting in the surface becoming extremely hard. Hard anodised cookware has very even heat conductivity and is long-lasting and durable, exhibiting very high resistance to scratching, chipping, peeling, warping and corrosion. Hard anodised cookware also has a non-stick coating on the interior of all pieces for quick and easy food release and clean-up. The exterior is also naturally more stick resistant than traditional cookware.
How is hard anodised cookware different from stainless steel cookware?
Hard anodised aluminium cookware is made from aluminium and not stainless steel. Through the process of ‘anodisation’ the surface of the cookware becomes extremely hard and double the strength of stainless steel so it is long-lasting and highly durable, i.e., resistant to scratching, corrosion, peeling, chipping and warping. Hard anodised cookware also provides one of the best conductors of heat and even heat distribution. Stainless Steel cookware is typically a poor conductor of heat, requiring an aluminium or copper disc to be added to the base of the cookware. Hard anodised cookware also has a non-stick coating on the interior of every cookware piece for quick and easy food release and clean-up. The exterior of the cookware is also naturally less stick resistant. Stainless Steel cookware typically offers limited pieces with a non-stick coating – usually frying pans and sauté pans.
Are all types of cookware induction capable?
Not all types of cookware are induction capable or suitable for induction cooktops. Within the Stanley Rogers Cookware range, all types of cookware are induction capable except the Stanley Rogers Techtonic Hard Anodised range. Induction cooking is the fastest way to cook. Whilst initially it is more expensive given the purchase of an induction cooktop, in the long run energy bills are significantly reduced due to reduced cooking time and increased energy efficiency.
Is non-stick cookware safe to use?
Non-stick cookware is so safe it is being used by the medical profession for coating heart stimulators and small pipes used for replacement arteries. If small particles of non-stick coating are ever ingested due to peeling from improper use such as overheating, scratching and/or abrasive cleaners, PTFE which is the polymer ‘polytetrafluorothylene’ dominant in most non-stick coatings is inert and non toxic and will pass through the human system. Always ensure the non-stick coating is from a reputable company or brand such as Dupont, Tefal and Whitford, as they conduct stringent quality tests to ensure reduced wear-off under normal use and proper care. Stanley Rogers Cookware uses Whitford non-stick coatings such as Whitford Eclipse (Stainless Steel Cookware), Advanced Protec (Hard Anodised Cookware) and Whitford Quantum 11 (Carbon Steel Woks) . They all feature three layers of non-stick coating to outlast conventional non-stick cookware. Stanley Rogers Kitchen Cookware also uses Tefal three layered non-stick coating.
How should I care for my non-stick cookware?
To take best care of your non-stick cookware whether it be stainless steel, hard anodised or aluminium, always season or condition prior to first use (see pack instructions) to maintain the optimal performance of the non-stick coating. Suitable oils for seasoning are vegetable oils such as canola oil, vegetable oil, grapeseed oil, flaxseed oil and peanut oil as they have a high smoking point. Butter or olive oil is not recommended as they will smoke at low temperatures. Season the pan by simply spreading a thin layer of vegetable oil on the inner surface of the pan at heat on low to medium heat for 2 -3 minutes. Remove from heat and let the pan cool down. Wipe off any excess oil with a paper towel. Repeat from time to time.

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